mylocallife
KDA Offers Farmers’ Market and Direct-to-Consumer Virtual Workshop Series


Posted date: Jan 3, 2023

by: Admin My Local Life
990 Views
For Immediate Release:
January 3, 2023

Media please contact:
Heather Lansdowne
785-564-6706
AgMedia@ks.gov

MANHATTAN, Kansas — The Kansas Department of Agriculture and K-State Research and Extension (KSRE) will offer virtual workshops February 6-10, 2023, to assist farmers' market vendors and managers, and also for those wanting to sell food products directly to consumers. The workshop series includes five online Lunch and Learn sessions.

"Over the past two years, we've seen an increase in people's enthusiasm for locally sourced food, and these workshops will address common questions and concerns for farmers and small businesses who are embracing these opportunities to reach local consumers," said Londa Nwadike, food safety specialist with KSRE and the University of Missouri. "It's also important for farmers to understand certain legal, safety and financial parameters before choosing to sell either directly to the consumer or at a farmers' market." In 2022, more than 95 farmers' markets were registered with KDA's Central Registration of Farmers' Markets.

Dates and topics for each Lunch and Learn online session are as follows:

Monday, Feb. 6, noon to 1:00 p.m.: Accepting EBT/SNAP and Double Up Food Bucks
Tuesday, Feb. 7, noon to 1:00 p.m.: Meat and Poultry Regulations; Kansas Value Added Meats Lab
Wednesday, Feb. 8, noon to 1:00 p.m.: Kansas Sales Tax Information
Thursday, Feb. 9, noon to 1:00 p.m.: Food Safety Regulations; Kansas Value Added Foods Lab
Friday, Feb. 10, noon to 1:00 p.m.: Kansas Senior Farmers Market Nutrition Program

KDA's weights and measures program will offer free scale certification with a paid registration to an online workshop.

Registration for the February virtual workshops is now open. The cost is $5 per participant. Register at https://www.fromthelandofkansas.com/FMWorkshop.

For more information, contact Sammy Gleason, KDA's From the Land of Kansas marketing manager, at 785-564-6759 or fromthelandofkansas@ks.gov. The workshops are funded by the Kansas Center for Sustainable Agriculture and Alternative Crops and the Kansas Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Program, as well as by sponsors KSRE and KDA.

KDA is committed to providing an environment that enhances and encourages economic growth of the agriculture industry and the Kansas economy. Kansas farmers' markets not only provide a fresh food source, but also stimulate the local economy. The Kansas Ag Growth Strategy has identified training for small companies via workshops as a key growth outcome for the specialty crop sector. The farmers' market/direct-to-consumer workshops will provide education through partnerships to help make Kansas farmers, ranchers and agribusinesses more successful.
** PDF's available with this article **
Other Articles You Might Be Interested In
Practical Qabalah Lesson 4 Tree in Yesod 7 – Mirror
The underlying premise for these lessons is that the Original One says ‘I Am’, ‘Who am I?’ and ‘I Am That I Am’; meaning: Consciousness, Reflection, and Expansion. The Expansion creates vibrational reality and a means to interact and create and is ruled by the mathematical relationship of the Golden Mean1. Seeking out the Reflection denotes will and duality and is ruled by the square root of 22. And Consciousness is the foundation of reality as we are able to perceive it and is ruled
Conservation on Farmland & Rangeland since the 1980’s
By Fred Wedel,
retired NRCS District Conservationist

Have you heard of the "Dust Bowl" of the 1930s? Because of extreme drought and farming methods, a huge dust cloud made it to Washington D.C. Franklin D. Roosevelt was newly elected President. The United States was recovering from the Great Depression. The drought in the great plains caused the Dust Bowl and was made worse by the tillage methods used then.

Hugh Hammond Bennett was on Presidents Roosevelt"s staff. He
Local Artist Exhibits This Spring
Re-posted for Margaret Lister

Allison Grice's exhibit of photography and graphic design has opened at Quincy Gallery with a reception on March 2nd.

Ms Grice, a St Francis native, is well known here as an exceptionally talented artist with wide range of interests. Over the years, though, it is photography that has allowed her to share her heart.

Whether it's a rusty old pickup or wheat blowing in the breeze against a sunset, Ms Grice's photography shows her love of nature and history. Sh
Highlights from the Alumni Weekend
A gorgeous weekend, and our beautiful town of St. Francis made for the perfect setting for this year's Alumni weekend. Events were happening all around town including a photography show at the Art Center, the Motorcycle Museum, a special movie at the theater, a brat feed and the Genealogy Center at the Museum, Dragging Main, Night swimming, 9ine Foot Squirrel playing live at Cheyenne Bowl, Celebrate St. Francis 5K Run & 2 mile Walk, and the Celebrate St. Francis 2016 Golf Tournament.

Her
WHAT ARE COVER CROPS?
Written by Fred Wedel, Retired NRCS District Conservationist

What are cover crops? Cover crops are grown for the protection and enrichment of the soil. In Agriculture, cover crops are used to cover and protect the soil rather than to be harvested.

Cover crops are used to manage cropland and reduce soil erosion, improve soil fertility, improve soil quality, improve water storage, reduce pressure from weeds, pests and diseases, and improve biodiversity and wildlife in an agroecosystem.

Future Leadership Training Classes in Cheyenne County
There is a group of leaders in Cheyenne, Rawlins, Sherman and Thomas Counties that held discussions with K State Extension, Hansen Foundation and the Kansas Leadership Center regarding support for establishing sustainable leadership programs in these four counties. The first Community Builders class was held in Cheyenne County in 2007 and the last of four classes was held nine years ago in 2012. Close to 80 county residents participated in these classes. The original eight trainers have eithe
Rangeland Fencing
Written By Fred Wedel, retired NRCS District Conservationist
Photos By Cale Rieger, NRCS Natural Resource Specialist

Proper fence is needed for grazing livestock in a rotational grazing system. As mentioned before, a rest-rotation grazing system is essential for properly managing grazing systems in the western Kansas area of short grass and mid-grass prairie.

Many perimeter fences are 3 or 4 strands of barbed wire. Interior cross-fences are usually a single smooth wire. The interior fe