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Truly high speed internet in St Francis


Posted date: Apr 3, 2017
Edited
by: Jason Padgett
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We in St Francis have an opportunity to have truly high speed internet. To clarify, by high speed I mean speeds that most cities have not achieved, and are currently fighting to get. A physical, hard line, fiber-optic connection to every customer, business and residential. The max bandwidth being offered to any individual customer is 1 gigabyte per second (1000 mb/s), which is honestly more than many of our systems can handle. With bandwidth options starting at 25 mb/s (which is 10x more than I am getting through ATT), @ $50 a month. There are many options between the lowest and highest, something to fit any situation.

Here is the catch, we have to have 210 NEW customers signed up by May 1st, the current Eagle internet customers will be automatically switched, and therefore do not count toward that 210 sign up goal. So, 210 new customers, and Eagle Communications will invest the approx. 1/2 million dollars in St Francis, and our current and future internet needs. This is a big investment for Eagle, and even signing up our required (and hopefully more) customers, it will take years for them to get their investment back and start making a profit. But this project is a glimpse in to the future of Eagle Communications. After St Francis they will be able to install similar systems in other towns.

There is a Facebook page with much more information about this coming service: https://www.facebook.com/FibertothePremisesinStFrancis which also has a link to the Eagle sign up page: http://www.eaglecom.net/stfrancisfiber/

Service levels and pricing:
Residential (Mbps Download/Mbps Upload)
25/5 - $49.95 per month
50/5 - $79.95 per month
100/10 - $109.95 per month
250/50 - $179.95 per month
1000/100 - $279.95 per month
Commercial (Mbps Download/Mbps Upload)
30/15 - $59.95 per month
60/20 - $89.95 per month
100/35 - Call for pricing
250/75 - Call for pricing
1000/150 - Call for pricing
Static IP - $10 per month

The installation is coming soon, Eagle expects the first internet connection to go live sometime in June or July, but it could take the rest of the year to get everyone who signed up connected, so, get signed up soon, the higher you are on the list, the sooner you get truly fast internet speeds.

Any member of the St Francis Internet Committee will be able answer your questions, or even help you get through the sign up process.
The members are:
Kelly Frewen
Robert Grace
Jason Padgett
Eric Harper
JR Landenberger
Rob Schiltz
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